logo
Food Advertising by
Nyonya Duck Sioh

Nyonya Duck Sioh

This fantastic Peranakan dish gives off great flavour but isn't all that great on the way it looks. It took a whole lotta effort and time to try my best to get the best shot of this duck dish. I mean, the taste is so incredible, but I can't exactly let you try that over the monitor, so the best way is to entice you with the best "eat me, eat me" photos I can capture. Nyonya Duck Sioh

Nyonya Duck Sioh is a favourite in my family. My grandmother would cook it frequently along with her other famous Peranakan dishes, including the Nyonya Kuah Lada and Nyonya Pong Tauhu. The Duck Sioh, however, is in a league of its own, in that it is an acquired taste. My mother, who isn't Peranakan, does not eat this AT ALL. In fact, she was the one who cooked this dish this time according to my grandmother's recipe, and she had to have me taste the dish in order to adjust the seasoning as she has no idea what it is supposed to taste like. The first and last time that she had a taste of the Duck Sioh was years and years ago, and it was from that one taste that she decided she is not a fan of this dish. All the other members of my family (including myself) who has Peranakan blood coursing through their veins LOVE it, and therefore, my mum and I concluded that perhaps only Peranakans get it, everyone else just cannot get themselves to love the Duck Sioh as much as we do. Even my husband, who is half Peranakan like myself, enjoyed eating it when he first tried it, even though he had never tried it before having met me.

The original name of this dish is "Itek Sioh" - "Itek" means Duck and while there is no official meaning for "Sioh", my guess is that that is merely a word that is used to describe the gravy in the Duck Sioh, which isn't as runny as a stew or soup ("Kuah"), but merely sticks to the duck with a little extra sauce on the platter for you to mix in with your rice. It is a complicated dish to describe. BUT, the taste is easy - just absolutely YUMMY. I get excited every time my grandmother announces that she has Itek Sioh on the menu when we step into her house, and this always prompts a delightful "yay!" from me.

If you like duck and want to try it cooked differently, in a wonderfully exotic style dish, this Duck Sioh recipe is one to keep in your recipe box.

Nyonya Duck Sioh

You will need~ - Half a Duck (chopped into pieces) - 3/4 cups of blended Shallots - 3/4 Coriander Powder - 120g Assam (Tamarind pulp) - 2-3 cups Water - 1/2 cup of Sugar - 2 teaspoons of Dark Soy sauce - Salt and White Pepper to taste

First, prepare the shallots by blending them up in a food processor. The measurement of 3/4 cup is of the shallots after they are blended. Mix the Assam/Tamarind pulp with about 1/2 cup of hot water. In a large bowl, marinate the duck with the blended shallots, coriander powder and Assam. Add 2-1/2 to 3 cups of water in with the marinade and mix well. Leave this in the refrigerator to marinate for at least an hour.

When the duck has been marinated for at least an hour in the fridge, take the bowl with the duck and the marinade and pour all contents, sauce and all, into a heated wok. When the sauce mixture starts to boil, lower the fire and allow it to simmer. Depending on how soft you want the duck meat to be, let it simmer for about 1 hour. As the sauce is thick, it will dry out very easily and quickly, it is therefore advised that you either check on it every 5-8 minutes to give it a stir or really just standby next to the stove to move it around because the bottom of the wok will burn the duck. Using a fork, or a small knife, check on the duck meat by giving it a poke and tasting it to see if it has tenderized. When you are ready to serve, add the sugar into the sauce spoon by spoon, stirring it to completely incorporate it into the sauce. Also add in the dark soy sauce, a pinch of salt and a dash of white pepper. Serve with white rice.

Nyonya Duck Sioh

 

Printable Version>>

Nyonya Duck Sioh
Recipe Type: Main
Cuisine: Peranakan
Author:
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
Serves: 4-6
A wonderfully flavourful classic Peranakan dish - Tender and soft duck swathed in a thick delicious sauce.
Ingredients
  • Half a Duck (chopped into pieces)
  • 3/4 cups of blended Shallots
  • 3/4 Coriander Powder
  • 120g Assam (Tamarind pulp)
  • 2-3 cups Water
  • 1/2 cup of Sugar
  • 2 teaspoons of Dark Soy sauce
  • Salt and White Pepper to taste
Instructions
  1. First, prepare the shallots by blending them up in a food processor. The measurement of 3/4 cup is of the shallots <em>after</em> they are blended.
  2. Mix the Assam/Tamarind pulp with about 1/2 cup of hot water.
  3. In a large bowl, marinate the duck with the blended shallots, coriander powder and Assam.
  4. Add 2-1/2 to 3 cups of water in with the marinade and mix well.
  5. Leave this in the refrigerator to marinate for at least an hour.
  6. When the duck has been marinated for at least an hour in the fridge, take the bowl with the duck and the marinade and pour all contents, sauce and all, into a heated wok.
  7. When the sauce mixture starts to boil, lower the fire and allow it to simmer.
  8. Depending on how soft you want the duck meat to be, let it simmer for about 1 hour.
  9. [b] As the sauce is thick, it will dry out very easily and quickly, it is therefore advised that you either check on it every 5-8 minutes to give it a stir or really just standby next to the stove to move it around because the bottom of the wok will burn the duck. Using a fork, or a small knife, check on the duck meat by giving it a poke and tasting it to see if it has tenderized. [/b]
  10. When you are ready to serve, add the sugar into the sauce spoon by spoon, stirring it to completely incorporate it into the sauce.
  11. Also add in the dark soy sauce, a pinch of salt and a dash of white pepper.
  12. Serve with white rice.

 



Stir-fry Beef and Broccoli

Stir-fry Beef and Broccoli

The hottest sauce I have ever tasted

The hottest sauce I have ever tasted